Quick And Easy Teochew Muah Chee 麻糍 – Gluten Free

  

Muah Chee 麻糍 is a Southern Chinese (Fujianese) dessert, is a steamed sticky dough made of glutinous rice flour which cut into small pieces and coated with lots of crush peanut and sugar.  
Muah Chee can be found in South East Asia, especially Malaysia and Singapore. This is a childhood treat for me when I’m little. Lots of recipe require to steam the dough for 45mins. But this recipe, which was shared by my friend Lorna Tan, is a short cut of making this supper soft muah Chee, it require no steaming at all and can be ready in under 15mins, the Camel brand ground peanut powder already has got sugar in there, so is just pour and serve! This dessert is very good for entertaining guest as it is super fast to prepare and yummy! All you need is glutinous rice flour and the peanut powder! 
Serve 2
Ingredients:

1 cup of glutinous rice flour

1 cup of water

1/2 tbsp of fried shallot oil – see note below 

1 tablespoon toasted white sesame seed

1 tablespoon fried shallot

100g Camel brand Ground Peanut Powder

Method:

Pour 50g of the peanut powder onto the serving plate, set aside 

  
Mix the flour and water in a bowl and use a hand whisk and mix well

  
Heat a non stick pan with oil and pour in the batter 

  
cook over medium low heat. Fold the mixture from the sides to the middle of the pan with a spatula till it forms a soft, wobbly dough. Lower the heat and continue to cook the dough till the sides are clean and form into a ball

  
remove to the serving plate and cut into bite size 

  
Sprinkle in the another 50g peanut powder, sesame seed and a little fried shallot and serve immediately 

Note: fried shallot oil can be obtained by frying sliced shallots in oil till shallots become golden brown, drain the fried shallots and reserve the oil

PULUT INTI – Coconut Glutinous Rice – Gluten Free

  

Pulut Inti or Glutinous Rice With Sweet Coconut is a traditional malay dessert found in southeast asia – Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore.  They are great snacks to be enjoyed over an afternoon tea or as a dessert.  The steamed glutinous rice is infused with coconut milk and served with grated coconut that’s been cooked with Palm sugar.  This is a very pretty and yummy dessert to serve when you are entertaining, and it is also gluten free! 

Ingredients

(A)

600g glutinous rice – (soaked overnight or at least 6 hours), drained 

2 pandan leaves – tie in a knot

40ml water

200ml coconut milk (I use Chef’s choice brand)

(B): mix well in a bowl 

200ml coconut milk

1 1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sugar

(C)

a few drops​ blue food colouring

(D)

454gms (1 pkt) ​Frozen Grated Coconut or fresh grated coconut

230g​ good quality Gula Melaka – cut into small pieces (or to taste)

2 pandan leaves

Method for the coconut:

1. Heat a non stick wok, put in the Gula Melaka and fry in low heat till melted

  
2. Add in the coconut and pandan leaves and fry till the coconut has fully absorb the Gula Melaka, taste and make sure it is sweet and damp before 3. turn off the fire and leave to cool

Note: if it is not sweet enough add more Gula Melaka, if is too dry add some coconut milk

  
Method for the rice:

1. Prepare the steamer on high heat
2. Put (A) into a 7 inch square tin and steam (use 1st tier) for 30 mins over high heat
3. When the time is up, remove the rice from the steamer, add (B) and mix well with a ladle, then make some holes and steam for another 15 mins (or until cooked and soft)  
4. take about 1/3 of the rice into another blow and add a few drops of blue colouring and mix.

 
5. Combine the white and blue rice together and mix.  

  
To serve:

1. Spoon the rice into mini muffins tray (I use mini cup) use a spoon to press lightly

2. remove to a plate, scoop the coconut using a measuring spoon (1/2 tbsp) and make into a dome shape then put on top of the rice

3. repeat till all ingredients finished.

Fried White Carrot Cake 菜头粿 – Gluten Free

  


Carrot cake, also known as “fried carrot cake” in Southeast Asian countries. There is no connection between this dish and the sweet Western carrot cake eaten as a dessert. There’s No Carrot in this Carrot Cake, as it is made with radish cake (steamed rice flour, water, and shredded white radish), which is then stir-fried with eggs, preserved radish, garlic and fish sauce. There are two variants that are being served by hawkers in Singapore and Malaysia: the “white” version (which is gluten free version) does not use sweet soy sauce, and the carrot cake is fried on top of a beaten egg to form a crust; the “black” version uses sweet sauce (molasses) and the egg is simply mixed in with the carrot cake.

The dish has many fans, particularly in Singapore and Malaysia, where it is enjoyed by people of different dialect groups and races, and not just the Teochews, and is served in a range of establishments ranging from the simplest hawkers to the most expensive Chinese restaurants. It is a much-loved local comfort food in the region, and can be consumed at various times of the day; it goes from being a breakfast dish, to a side dish, to a late-night supper dish. 


Ingredient for the Kueh:

9 inch Square steaming tray

300g white radish 

300g rice flour

440ml water

800ml boiling water

2 teaspoon salt
Method for the Kueh:

Prepare your steamer 
Shred the radish finely

  
In a big mixing bowl, mix the rice flour with 440ml and stir well

  
Bring the 800ml water to a rapid boil, then pour into the flour mixture and use a hand whisk and mix well

   

Add in the radish and salt and mix well. Pour into the baking tray 

  
steam on high heat for 45min, leave to completely cool before putting them in the fridge

To Fry:

50g Preserved radish – soak for 10 min then squeeze dry

mined garlic 

eggs

Seasoning
:

fish sauce

pepper
Garnish:

spring onion chopped
Method:

Cut out 300g of carrot cake into pieces 
Beat 2 eggs and add 1/2 teaspoon fish sauce in a bowl and set aside
Heat 2 tablespoon oil, add in carrot cake in and quickly cut carrot cake into small pieces with the ladle and pan fry both side till golden brown

  
Push the cake to the side of the pan and leave a space in the middle

  
add in 1 teaspoon oil, 1 teaspoon garlic and 2 teaspoon preserved radish and stir fry thoroughly while drizzle 1 1/2 teaspoon (Or to taste) fish sauce all over and then mix well 
Slowly drizzle beaten eggs all over and pan fry till golden brown and crispy on both side

  
Garnish with spring onion and serve immediately.      

Quick And Easy Muah Chee 麻糍 – Gluten Free

     

Muah Chee 麻糍 is a Southern Chinese (Fujianese) dessert, is a steamed sticky dough made of glutinous rice flour which cut into small pieces and coated with lots of crush peanut and sugar.  

Muah Chee can be found in South East Asia, especially Malaysia and Singapore. This is a childhood treat for me when I’m little. Lots of recipe require to steam the dough for 45mins. But this recipe, which was shared by my friend Lorna Tan, is a short cut of making this supper soft muah Chee, it require no steaming at all and can be ready in under 15mins, the Camel brand ground peanut powder already has got sugar in there, so is just pour and serve! This dessert is very good for entertaining guest as it is super fast to prepare and yummy! All you need is glutinous rice flour and the peanut powder! 
Serve 2
Ingredients:

1 cup of glutinous rice flour

1 cup of water

1/2 tbsp of cooking oil

100g Camel brand Ground Peanut Powder

  
Method:

Pour 50g of the peanut powder onto the serving plate

Mix the flour and water in a bowl and use a hand whisk and mix well

  

Heat a non stick pan with oil and pour in the batter 

  
cook over medium low heat. Stir the mixture with a spatula till it forms a soft, wobbly dough. Lower the heat and continue to cook the dough till it almost forming ball of dough, add in the cooking oil and cook till the sides are clean and form into a ball

  
remove to the serving plate and cut into bite size 

   
 pour in the another 50g peanut powder and serve immediately 

Chwee Kueh 水粿 Steamed Rice Cake – Gluten Free

  
Chwee kueh – literally: “water rice cake”, is a type of steamed rice cake, which is a popular breakfast item in Singapore.  
To make chwee kueh, rice flour and water are mixed together to form a slightly viscous mixture, and are then placed in small cup-shaped metal containers that look like saucers and steamed, forming a bowl-like shape when cooked. The rice cakes at extra soft and are topped with Chye-Poh (diced preserved radish), which is super delicious (albeit oily) and served with chilli sauce. Trust me, you can’t stop at 3 pieces!
When I first started to make chwee Kueh, it irritates me a lot when the chwee Kueh has got a dent in the middle after steaming. My husband always comfort me by saying thing like “is ok, just cover up with Chye-Poh.”, but I just don’t like the look of it, and cover it up does not solve the problem! Finally, few years ago, a friend of mine told me the secret to make a flat nice chwee Kueh – the hot water must be boiled over the stove and not using electric kettle. The hot water from the stove will thicken the batter, whereas the hot water from the kettle will not, if the batter is not thicken, you still can salvage it by putting the batter onto the stove and cook it just for a little while to thicken. Of course, if you find it too troublesome to cook the batter, you still can go ahead to steam the batter, all you will get is a “dent” in the middle of the Chwee Kueh.

Today, I make this chwee Kueh gluten free by removing the wheat starch. And I often use this recipe as Tapioca flour is something I always have in my pantry and I don’t have to purposely go out and get a packet of wheat starch 

Ingredients For The Batter:

280g​ rice flour

4 teaspoon​​ Sago or Tapioca flour

2 teaspoon​ salt 

300ml​ cold water

830ml​ hot boiling water (must measure the water first, put in a small pot and use stove to boil till bubbles, cannot use kettle to boil)

4 tablespoon​ cooking oil – put in last
Directions:

Mix flour and salt in a large, heat prove bowl, add in cold water. Mix well in one direction using a hand whisk
add in the boiling water (all at once) to mixture, it should look translucent 

Use a hand whisk and stir till thicken and whiten in color, in one direction
add in the oil and stir well
Brush a little oil onto the mould

scoop out the mixture into the mould, using a spatula to even out the top
steam for 15 mins

Chye-Poh Topping:

150g Chye-Poh (Preserved Radish, salted turnip)菜脯

20g dried shrimp 虾米, soak

2 tablespoon Toasted White Sesame

1 tablespoon Minced Garlic

1 tablespoon Minced Shallot

1 1/4 cup Cooking Oil

2 tablespoon sesame oil
Seasoning:

2 tablespoon Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Salt

1/2 teaspoon Pepper

2 teaspoon Light Soy Sauce

1/4 teaspoon Dark Soy Sauce
Directions: 

Rinse radish under running tap water briefly. Use your hand to squeeze out the excess water from the radish

Minced the shrimps in a blender, remove and set aside
Put in the radish and chop into smaller pieces.
Heat up a pan. Toast the white sesame by frying it for about 1 minute. Remove and set aside.
Use the same pan, dry fry the radish to remove excess water in it for about 2 minutes. Remove and set aside.
Heat up oil and sesame oil in the pan, fry dried shrimp for about a minute until fragrant. Add in minced garlic and shallots.
Add in preserved radish and mix until all oil is absorbed. Cook over low heat for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Mix in seasoning and toasted sesame seeds.

Allow it to cool. Keep in a air-tight container and store in the fridge for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to a month. Heat up before use.

Dorayaki 銅鑼焼き – Gluten Free Option

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I love Dorayaki because I love red bean paste. Dorayaki is one of the most popular Japanese confectioneries. It is Anko (sweet red bean paste) sandwiched between sweet pancakes. The other reason why I love Dorayaki is because when I was a kid, I love “Doraemon” and in almost every episode has a scenes of him eating Dorayaki! So whenever I think of Dorayaki, I think of Doraemon!

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Ingredients for pancake:
1 eggs
25g caster sugar
1/2 tbsp honey
100g milk
100g plain flour / White Wing Gluten Free Plain Flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
3/4 tsp baking powder / Gluten Free Baking Powder
30g melted butter

Ingredients for fillings:
Sweet red bean paste

Method:
In a mixing bowl, use a hand whisk and beat the eggs and sugar till well, add in the honey and milk and beat well
Sift in the plain flour, baking soda and baking powder and stir in one direction till a smooth and thick,batter is formed
Add in the melted butter and mix well. Strain
Heat non-stick frying pan with a small amount of oil and wipe excess oil well. At medium low heat, drop 2 tbsp of batter onto the pan, like a pancake. Cook about 2 minutes until the surface of the pancake has a lot of bubbles and the edges become dry. Flip over and cook 1 more minute.
Transfer to a plate and cover with a wet paper towel.
Take one cake and place a heaping tablespoon of Anko and cover with another pan cake. Wrap it with plastic and press with hands. Pinch to seal the edges of the pancakes together.

Gula Melaka Huat Kueh 椰糖发糕 – Gluten Free Option

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Make about 10

Ingredients:
250ml coconut milk
200g gula Melaka, broken into small pieces
50ml water
300g self-raising flour / White Wing Gluten Free Self Raising Flour

Method:
Prepare steamer on high heat
Sift the flour into a mixing bowl
Boil the gula Melaka with water till melted, immediately remove from heat then add coconut milk and mix well.
Strain to remove impurities. Leave to cool.
Pour the syrup into the flour using a hand whisk to mix well till smooth
Line muffin cups inside the metal Chwee Kueh mould
Fill the prepared tins with the mixture to the BRIM and steam immediately for 35 mins over high heat. Ensure the steamer is air-tight.
Leave the cakes to cool before serving.